Monthly Archives: September 2019

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Akina Fay is a medical student in the Class of 2020 at McGill University.

 

 

 

Days after my fourteenth birthday, I was diagnosed with a rare brain malformation and underwent emergency brain surgery to prevent my spinal cord from dissecting.

Days after my seventeenth birthday, my mother was diagnosed with a rare form of incurable cancer.

At the age of twenty, I started medical school and began to piece together the pathophysiological processes that lead to our illnesses.

At the age of twenty-two, my mother died in my arms after a grueling year of hospitalizations, pain and suffering.

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CMAJ’s Holiday Reading is back! CMAJ Blogs will host the popular Holiday Reading series online in December 2019.

We’re seeking witty, offbeat, whimsical stories grounded in medicine. Have ideas? Email blogs@cmaj.ca 

Need inspiration? Check out some popular stories from previous years:

Pathology in the Hundred Acre Wood

Limitations

Diving into the ice bucket challenge

Kacper Niburski is a medical student in the Class of 2021 at McGill University. He is also the CMAJ student humanities blog editor. Follow his writing instagram: @_kenkan.

 

 

The following was written because of this floating into my inbox like ash.

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Dear dear,

You asked me what objects looked like breasts. It was morning and the sun was yawning and you said you needed to write a thing for a thing. What thing, I asked? For a class, you told me. I flopped pancakes onto your plate, watched them deflate like a frown. Your pajamas were hanging loose, threads licked skin. Hair was a brown bush for birds or fingers. Eyes tired, hungry. Coffee beans were roasting. Burning. ...continue reading

Ever wish you could ask a wise, kind, approachable Student Affairs Dean something about CaRMS, without having to admit the question was yours?

Enter Dear Dr. Horton. Send the anonymous CaRMs questions that keep you up at night to a real former Dean of Medical Student Affairs, Dr. Jillian Horton. We will use your questions to shape a special upcoming CaRMS podcast.

Submit your questions anonymously through this form.

See an example from last year: CaRMS interview tips!

Grace Zhao is a third year MD/MSc student in the Systems Leadership and Innovation program at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation.

 

Ontario is undergoing its biggest health system reform in 50 years. Under Premier Doug Ford, 20 health agencies will be merged into a superagency – Ontario Health. The rationale behind this is to eliminate duplicative back office infrastructure and administration in order to streamline work to achieve integrated and coordinated care. The functional unit would be the Ontario Health Teams, which are made up of local health care providers who work together to provide coordinated care through technology.

With much attention being placed on health systems innovation and transformation, I asked two health system leaders on their thoughts about leading system innovation and transformation and the current climate of Ontario’s health care system. ...continue reading

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Due to the sensitivity of the post, the author wished to publish the following piece anonymously. 

Dear Student,

On behalf of the Admissions Committee, we are pleased to reward you an offer of admission to the Doctor of Medicine Program!

This year our Committee received over 5,000 applications, and extended less than 250 offers of admission. However, medicine is not a meritocracy. Upon meeting peers from diverse backgrounds, you will quickly realize that applicants differed in their advantages throughout the admissions process. “Not every applicant had the same access to opportunities to demonstrate or enhance his or her commendable qualities”. ...continue reading

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Neil Chanchlani is a CMAJ Associate Editor and clinical research fellow at the University of Exeter, UK. He recently attended the 8th EBMLive conference in Oxford, England.

 

All healthcare practitioners are encouraged to make decisions that are based on strong evidence. But often we don’t – sometimes because the evidence is poor and conflicting, other times because we are ignorant and unaware and, rarely, because we aren’t comfortable with updating our practice. So we need to keep Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) on the frontline and not on the (academic) shelves  - we need to remind clinicians, researchers, and patients that decisions should be based on the best possible data. ...continue reading