Reflections

berghDr Rod Bergh is a general pediatrician who has practiced medicine since the early 1960s.

 

I have practiced Pediatrics for most of the 59 years since I graduated from Medical School and I have seen tremendous changes in our knowledge. For the past 16 years, I have restricted my practice to children with ADHD and have experienced the great satisfaction of seeing in this period about 3000 children turn their lives around.

Change is based on knowledge gained by research. However, I would like to point out an area where I believe we have ignored evidence, which has resulted in some less-than-optimal therapy for ADHD.  ...continue reading

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TH - PHSPTrevor Hancock is a professor and senior scholar at the University of Victoria’s school of public health and social policy

 

Some of the fundamental principles of our health-care system — universal access to a comprehensive range of services in a system that is publicly administered — are threatened by the court challenge being mounted by Dr. Brian Day. But there is no smoke without fire.

Back in the 1990s, I organized study tours for Swedish health-care managers interested in learning from Canada’s health-care system. In introducing them to the system, I would point out that we do not have a national health-care system, as they do in Sweden, the U.K. or many other places.

Instead, we have ...continue reading

David Cawthorpe is a Professor (Adjunct) in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Calgary, Alberta

 

By the end of this month the 22nd International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions (IACAPAP) Congress will have come and gone. As this will have been its second congress hosted in Canada since 1954, it is perhaps time to take stock.

In Istanbul, in 2008, our team got its first whiff of tear gas and we won the 2016 bid; it was the beginning of an exciting journey, wherein the hope was to form a national community around this torch, a mental health Olympics for children and adolescents. Did we succeed? A good question. Regionally, we hoped to gain access for at least 1000 participants who would never otherwise have the opportunity to attend such a world class event. Did we achieve this or will this congress have been just another big business venture? The proof will, no doubt, be in the residual pudding! ...continue reading

irisIris Gorfinkel is a General Practitioner and Founder & Principal Investigator of PrimeHealth Clinical Research in Toronto, Ontario

 

I’d been attending this particular patient’s medical needs as her GP for the past five years.  Enid dressed impeccably, was a young 85 years of age and had the amenities that most elders dream about.   She had her health, financial security, education and a strong intellect.  What she was missing was companionship.

“If only I had someone to travel with,” she lamented.

Hardly 24 hours later, I was asked to see Fred who had been my patient for 7 years.  He was a robust 87 year old, financially secure, well educated, and possessed a marvelous sense of humor.  He had remained active despite having lost his partner to lung cancer the year before.

 “I miss having someone when I travel,” he told me.

...continue reading

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TH - PHSPTrevor Hancock is a professor and senior scholar at the University of Victoria’s school of public health and social policy

 

Our health care system is not the only, and not even the most important determinant of the health of the population. But it is a determinant, and thus any threat to the proper functioning of the system is a threat to health. One such threat is the court case that started this week in the BC Supreme Court, in which Dr. Brian Day and others are seeking to overturn some of the fundamental principles on which the system is based.

Day co-founded the Cambie Surgery Centre in Vancouver in 1996; in essence it's a private hospital with a number of operating rooms, offering a wide range of surgical procedures. There is nothing wrong in principle with a private hospital. Most Canadians don’t seem to realise this, but much of our care is provided through privately-owned clinics – that is what your doctor’s office is. ...continue reading

charlesyinCharles Yin in a MD/PhD Candidate at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at Western University

 

On June 18, 2015 the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) announced that it would be withdrawing funding support for the nation’s 14 MD/PhD programs by the 2016/2017 academic year. This announcement caught program directors and trainees across the country by surprise, and was at odds with the recommendations of two advisory panels commissioned by the CIHR, both of which identified a particular need to improve upon how clinician scientist training in Canada. Although the cutting of the CIHR funding was a blow to MD/PhD programs across the country, it looks like these programs won’t be shutting their doors for the foreseeable future. Rather, this development provides us as clinician scientists, physicians, researchers and policy makers with an opportunity ...continue reading

doanRichard Doan is a Psychiatrist with Inner City Health Associates and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto in Toronto, Ontario

 

During my physical assessment course as a medical student more than three decades ago in Connecticut, the surgeon generously serving as our preceptor introduced us to a patient with a post-operative infection.  He mentioned treatment with an antibiotic, and I asked the mechanism of action.  He gave me a bemused look: “I don’t know how it works, it just does!”  A year later I used to eat my lunch in a small hospital sandwich shop, frequented by Attendings and known as the “Republican Club”.  I learned there that male physicians of a certain age (and almost all were male) mainly talked about golf and money.  Many years later, I find myself basically giving the same answer to my students about drug mechanisms, though thanks to the internet I can say that I am following current treatment guidelines.  However, I don’t golf, and I never really talk about money. . . until now. ...continue reading

020_ALEJANDRO LUCIAAlejandro Lucia is Professor of Physiology at the European University of Madrid. He has a particular research interest in endurance sport and exercise physiology

Carl Foster_crop

Carl Foster is Professor of Sports Medicine and Director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

 

In the past week we've watched the Olympic track and field events play out. Sprinting champions are likely to be Jamaicans or African Americans, whereas long distance champions tend to be Kenyans or Ethiopians, or from someplace not too far from the East African highlands. Do these seemingly typical talents and abilities for the relatively simple motor task of running reflect that some populations have a basic genetic endowment to excel in certain sport specialities? ...continue reading

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Headshot - Jeremy DevineJeremy Devine is a 3rd year Medical Student at The University of Toronto

 

On May 15th, 2016 the Conference to develop a federal framework on Lyme disease took place in Ottawa. A 30-day online consultation was launched on June 1, 2015 to inform the development of the Framework. Although ostensibly mandated by legislation, the conference was largely the work of Canada’s chief Lyme advocacy group: The Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation (CanLyme) and the patients they represent. CanLyme advocates for more liberal diagnostic and treatment guidelines ...continue reading

Adriano MollicaAdriano Mollica
University of Toronto
Class of 2019

I look at you, and I wish
there was some sort of incantation to whisper
that could string together all the fickle words
grazing around the summit of my throat
and instill a frenzy in their small limbs
so they may leap across the oceanic void
that is the silence between my mouth and you being healthy again. ...continue reading