Uncategorized

Dr. Carol Ann Courneya is an Associate Dean of Student Affairs at the University of British Columbia

SHATTERED by Sonam Maghera, Student, U of Ottawa Medicine

For the past eight years, the Canadian Conference in Medical Education (CCME) has acted as host to a fabulous medical trainee and practitioner art exhibit.  Called White Coat Warm heArt, it celebrates coast to coast Canadian medical creativity.

CCME participants routinely visit the exhibit, seen by many as a sanctuary for reflection in an otherwise busy conference setting. There are benefits for the trainees and practitioners in making the art ...continue reading

Larry W. Chambers is Research Director at McMaster University's Niagara Regional Campus, School of Medicine

 

Eric Larson committed his career to researching how to delay and prevent Alzheimer’s disease, other forms of dementia, as well as declining memory and thinking. He led the “Adult Changes in Thought study”, which began following a large general population cohort in 1986. It has one of the largest research populations that included individuals aged 85 years and older.

Larson’s new book, “Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for a Long, Active Life,” coauthored with professional writer and journalist Joan DeClaire, is based on information from hundreds of research papers Larson has authored and co-authored. The reader benefits from his profound understanding of health and aging research and his clinical experience as a practicing physician. Evidence is presented alongside useful patient stories to aid comprehension, engagement and to pique ...continue reading

1 Comment

Catherine Whicher is a graduate student of Global Health Policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Varoon Mathur is a Software Engineering/Data Science student at the University of British Columbia

 

Last week Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) published the 2017 University Report Card for Global Equity in Biomedical Research, evaluating fifteen of Canada's universities (U15) for their contributions to neglected health needs including biomedical research, equitable licensing, global health education, and transparency. This is the 5th iteration of the report card, but the first time UAEM focused exclusively on public research schools (and exclusively on Canada, for that matter). While there were some promising highlights of what our universities can do when they set themselves to it, overall it is clear that Canadian schools are failing to use their considerable power to address many neglected aspects of global health. ...continue reading

2 Comments

Kim Perrotta is Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment (CAPE)

 

A month ago the Financial Post published a commentary entitled “They keep saying shutting down coal will make us healthier, so how come there’s no evidence of it?” written by Warren Kindzierski of the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta. It seems a sad statement of our times that this article, which muddies the waters with incomplete facts and misleading information about coal plants, air pollution and human health, was published in the middle of  an important debate about policies aimed at supporting the phase-out coal plants Canada-wide by 2030. The Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment feels strongly that publication of the article was irresponsible. ...continue reading

Did you hear about Chris’s mint condition 1963 Shelby Cobra? Mechanics say he didn’t check the oil for decades, and the engine just seized one day on the way to work. When they opened it up, they say there wasn’t much left. Such a shame really.

Said Nobody. EVER.

Jazlin Mayhue is a researcher in Victoria, BC

Peter Hobza is a family physician in Victoria, BC

Robert O'Connor is a family physician in Victoria, BC

 

Introducing a new concept...

We all know folks who are not vigilant with preventive health for their body. However, a subset of them wouldn’t drive an irreplaceable million-dollar car until it was destroyed from lack of maintenance. A human’s life and body are irreplaceable, and worth at least a million dollars, when considering the price of an injury causing death. Therefore, it’s logical to help some people think of treating their body as well as a valuable car. ...continue reading

Iona Heath was a general practitioner in inner-city London for 35 years and is a Past President of the UK Royal College of General Practitioners.  She is a co-chair of the Scientific Committee for the 2017 Preventing Overdiagnosis conference

 

Over the past several decades, the economic interests of the pharmaceutical and medical technology industries have both pressured and tempted medicine to overextend itself.  The traditional moral commitment of the medical profession to relieve suffering and to care for the dying has been gradually displaced by a futile and misguided attempt to solve humanity’s most profound existential problems through biotechnical means.  Doctors now apply more and more powerful treatments towards the end of life and try to prevent diseases by seeking out and correcting more and more risk factors.  All this has led to an epidemic of overdiagnosis ...continue reading

AedanCoffeyAedan Coffey is a consultant electronic design engineer working in Ireland

 

We got hacked. Some nice person somewhere in the world managed to get into the little black box that connects our house to the internet and modify it. The result was that every time anyone in the house clicked on a link on a web page they were misdirected to some rather unsavoury ones instead.

To us this was merely an unpleasant inconvenience; no permanent damage was done and a few days later we had a new router and it was all fixed. But what happens when a medical device gets hacked? It’s probably not too serious if somebody manages to download all the data from the activity tracker on your wrist, but imagine the consequences of a pacemaker that is suddenly set to defibrillate continuously at its maximum power, an insulin pump that delivers its complete reservoir of insulin in a few moments or a ventilator that just stops working without any alarms going off.

You may think these things can’t happen. ...continue reading

11 Comments

VKoskenojaphoto

Viktoria Koskenoja is an emergency medicine resident in her fourth year of the Harvard-Affiliated Emergency Medicine ResidehaleyKcochranency

 

Haley K. Cochrane is  an emergency medicine resident in her second year of the Harvard-Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency

 

We are Canadian women, born and raised in northern Canadian communities. We are both training to be emergency physicians at the Harvard-Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency in Boston. While we would like to come home, there are only massive barriers before us.

There is a known scarcity of emergency physicians (EPs) in Canada. The combination of physician shortages, as well as a concentration of specialists in urban centers, has led to regions where up to 70 percent of ED providers have no formal emergency medicine (EM) training. “With a national shortage of trained emergency physicians, most Canadians will continue to have their emergency care delivered by family physicians,” states the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, “[with] no guarantee that the family physician staffing a community ED will have adequate training in the management of actual emergencies or in resuscitation.” In recognizing these workforce issues, the CAEP recommended increasing residency spots for CCFP (EM) and FRCP-EM programs as well as increasing the use of mid-level providers. But what about a simpler, more cost-effective option—allow U.S. trained EPs to return to Canada? ...continue reading

6 Comments

Ryhana DawoodRyhana Dawood
Western University
Class of 2016

“I have stage 4 lung cancer. I’m dying and this is where I will spend my last days.”

I listened as a vulnerable, palliative, homeless man told our team about his life in a homeless shelter in Toronto. I watched him and thought of my great aunt who passed away from cancer, surrounded by her loved ones, housed, safe and comfortable. I was left feeling ashamed - how could we allow people to pass in such circumstances? ...continue reading

Interview with Dr. Elissa Abrams, Pediatric Allergist Immunologist with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba. Guidelines used to recommend that parents avoid feeding their infants common allergenic foods in their first year, but expert advice has recently changed. Emerging evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that early introduction of allergenic foods, particularly peanut, is protective against the development of food allergy. Dr. Abrams and her co-author Dr. Allan Becker discuss the updated recommendations in their analysis article in the CMAJ (subscription required) that examines food introduction and allergy prevention in infants.

...continue reading