Tag Archives: Canadian federal government

Nigel Rawson is President of Eastlake Research Group

 

Donna Lawrence is Director, HTA and Health Economics, with PDCI Market Access Inc.

 

You’ve been diagnosed with a rare disorder. It’s probably taken several referrals to many different medical specialists, countless tests and some misdiagnoses for you to get here because it frequently takes years to reach a correct diagnosis. Now what? Is there a medicine available to reduce your suffering or extend your life?

The odds are against you because fewer than one tenth of the estimated 7,000 rare disorders have an effective treatment. However, more and more drugs for these disorders are becoming available. You’re lucky – your physician tells you that a safe and effective drug has been approved by Health Canada. But, accessing it will likely mean travelling the Beatles’ long and winding road, surmounting obstacles along the way.

...continue reading

Nigel Rawson is President at Eastlake Research Group

 

The 2019 federal budget announced that the federal government will take initial steps towards implementing national pharmacare to improve the affordability and accessibility of prescription drugs across Canada. The government's plan includes the development of "three foundational" elements - a national Canadian Drug Agency (CDA), a comprehensive national drug formulary, and a national strategy for high-cost rare-disorder medicines. ...continue reading

TH - PHSPTrevor Hancock is a professor and senior scholar at the University of Victoria’s school of public health and social policy

 

The federal election seems to be focusing largely on issues such as the economy and security. If health is mentioned at all, it is in the context of health care.

But health care is a determinant of our health; it is not the main one. While our genetic inheritance also plays an important part, much of our health comes from the environmental, social, economic, cultural and political conditions we create as communities and as a society.

In our system, the federal government does not provide health care or manage a health-care system, aside from special situations such as for aboriginal people and the armed forces. But many other areas of policy for which the federal government does have full or at least partial jurisdiction do influence the health of Canadians. ...continue reading