Tag Archives: CANMEDs

At its core, humanism is a concept which weaves together the science and the art of medicine. The American Arnold P. Gold Foundation, established by the Gold family in an effort to “nurture and preserve the tradition of the caring physician,” has been striving to accomplish this since its inception through the development of various programs — including the Humanism in Medicine Award at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) to honour caring and compassionate mentors in medical school education.

Dr. Sarita Verma, Vice President of Education at the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC), notes that this ideal — providing compassionate care that is sensitive to patients’ values, as well as the integrity and nature of the physician-patient relationship — resonates quite strongly with Canadian medical students as well. ...continue reading

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This article is co-authored** by (top row) Christina M. Nowik , Pamela Lai, Thomas McLaughlin, Simon Moore, (bottom row) Gillian Shiau, Natasha Snelgrove, Nureen Sumar, and Jasmin Yee, all of whom previously served on the Resident Doctors of Canada (RDoC) Resiliency Working Group

 

For Canadian resident doctors, July 1st is more than a national holiday; it represents the day when newly-minted doctors become responsible for decisions in patient care.  While this is an exciting day, it can also be fraught with anxiety and stress. Over the course of residency, acute work-related stressors, including traumas and patient deaths, can negatively impact residents’ wellbeing.  Additionally, residents endure chronic stressors such as large debts, extended work  hours, and isolation from family.  These factors predispose residents to burnout. The prevalence of burnout among resident doctors is up to a staggering 75%. Resiliency interventions have been shown to work, and the time to begin implementing them nationwide is now. ...continue reading

J_DuffinJacalyn Duffin is a hematologist and historian who holds the Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine at Queen’s University

 

Recently, I addressed first and second year residents in the Queen’s University family medicine program, during their annual retreat at Camp Oconto, near Sharbot Lake, Ontario. Roughly every other year for some time now, I’ve been asked to talk to them about my work on drug shortages and what drives them, my website (which I mentioned in my previous blog), and the mysterious causes, harms and  frustrations of drug shortages. ...continue reading