Tag Archives: children

Interview with Dr. Brett Thombs, professor in the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University and senior investigator of the Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital in Montreal. He is also chair-elect of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care and chair of the tobacco guideline working group.

In their clinical guideline published in the CMAJ (open access), Dr. Thombs and the Task Force reviewed the evidence supporting behavioural interventions for prevention and treatment of smoking in children and youth. He explains their findings in this podcast.

Listen to the author interview:

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Diagnostic delay of central nervous system tumours in children has serious implications for the children and their families. Dr. Ran Goldman, Pediatrician at BC Children's Hospital, Professor of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia and Chief Medical Officer for the website medschoolforparents.com, discusses how practitioners can maintain a high index of suspicion for these rare tumours, yet not overinvestigate benign conditions.

Dr. Goldman co-authored a review article (subscription required) on pediatric central nervous system tumours published in CMAJ.

Listen to the podcast:

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IMG_1655Laura Stymiest (3)Laura Stymiest is a paediatrics resident at Dalhousie University. She previously trained at the Coady International Institute and has researched in the area of Social Paediatrics. She writes with...

Ford Jones_Lee (3)

Elizabeth Lee-Ford Jones, an expert adviser with EvidenceNetwork.ca, and Prof of Paediatrics at SickKids in Toronto.

 

I remember being a second year medical student working in a paediatric clinic.

I see a young girl who has been referred for inability to pay attention in the classroom. The child’s teacher is concerned she has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and possibly, a learning disability.

I am just beginning to establish my approach to patient problems and complex medical illness.

As I make my way through the medical history, the child’s parents tell me they are struggling to make ends meet. Despite their best efforts combined with collections from a nearby food bank, the little girl often goes to school hungry. ...continue reading

Dr. Diane Kelsall, deputy editor, interviews Dr. Jason Stull, veterinarian and Assistant Professor at Ohio State University. Dr. Stull has co-authored a review article published in CMAJ. The authors say that health care providers should counsel patients regarding safe pet ownership, particularly those who are pregnant or who have altered immunity, and families with exotic pets and very young children. Stull and colleagues’ review of pet-associated infections provides practitioners with the tools to do this. ...continue reading

sarahC

Sarah Currie is a medical copy editor on CMAJ

The opposite of play is not work. It’s depression. — Brian Sutton-Smith

A little nonsense now and then is cherished by the wisest men.― Roald Dahl, Charlie & the Great Glass Elevator

Recess Rules

What happens when we play? What changes do we notice in our bodies? When we play a game with others, how do we experience those players? What physical or physiological responses to the actions or emotions involved do we notice? What is play? According to Jill  Vialet, author of the book 'Recess Rules', play is like pornography: you know it when you see it. The dictionary definition includes words like “aimless” and “frivolous.” Bernard Suits described playing a game as a voluntary attempt to overcome unnecessary obstacles. But we shouldn’t be so dismissive of play and its benefits and rewards.

People who play are more trusting; they are better self-regulators and can resolve conflict more effectively. Groups who play together have healthier interactions ...continue reading