Tag Archives: chronic disease

There is mounting evidence now suggesting that prematurity may lead to a variety of adult diseases, such as hypertension, obstructive lung disease, or osteopenia. However, there is little guidance for physicians on how to provide proper long-term follow-up for their patients who were born preterm.

In this podcast, two of the co-authors of a review article published in CMAJ (subscription required), Dr. Tuy Mai Luu, clinician-scientist at Sainte-Justine Hospital and teaching assistant in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Montreal, and Dr. Anne-Monique Nuyt, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Montreal and Chief of neonatology at Sainte-Justine Hospital explain the evidence linking pre-term birth and adult chronic diseases.

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Domhnall_MacDomhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK

 

We expect Nobel Prize winners to be high profile researchers of almost celebrity status, pioneering cutting edge science that changes the world at a stroke. And, then I heard that one of this year’s winners was William C Campbell, a fellow Irish man. I didn’t recognise the name, was unfamiliar with his work, and knew nothing of his background. But, as the media story broke, I learned more about him. He came from Ramelton, a small village in County Donegal, far from the bright lights and, like many Irish doctors, undertook his graduate work in the US. His research was in worms - not the type of glamorous cutting edge clinical science that features in glossy magazines but, from the messy world of vials and dishes and parasitic roundworms kept in the freezer.

“You must be kidding!” was his reaction, when telephoned with the news.

But, his findings did change the world. ...continue reading

Bruce Guthrie05_resizeBruce Guthrie is Professor of Primary Care Medicine at the University of Dundee in Scotland. He is a keynote speaker at this week's Society for Academic Primary Care annual conference in Oxford.

 

Multimorbidity is usually defined as present when people have two or more chronic conditions. It’s an idea that appeals to medical generalists because it makes clear that specialist care that only focuses on one of those conditions may sometimes be too narrow, particularly when someone has very many conditions or when the conditions they have are very different. Physical and mental health conditions are the exemplar of the latter, with many countries having separate services ...continue reading

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Émilie LacharitéÉmilie Lacharité is Digital Content Editor at CMAJ

There is undeniably a modern surge of chronic disease, gut disorders and autoimmune diseases (cancer, Crohn’s, celiac disease, diabetes, lupus, etc.), especially in the Western world. Patients as well as physicians are paying more attention to the influence of external and lifestyle factors, especially nutrition, stress, and physical movement, on health and chronic systemic inflammation. There seems to be a shift towards patient-centered and whole-body medicine (as opposed to organ-driven diagnosis). More and more patients want to move away from the one-disease-one-pill mentality.

This week, until September 15th, there is a very interesting and perhaps lesser-known online event happening called the Evolution of Medicine Summit. 40 health experts (most of them MDs) are sharing their research, experience and observations regarding the important influence of lifestyle factors on overall health.

The opening talk on Monday was by Dr. Joel Evans, board-certified OB/GYN, senior teaching faculty at the Institute for Functional Medicine and Centre for Mind/Body Medicine. Dr. Evans says that medicine has become depersonalized ...continue reading