Tag Archives: clerkship

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Mei Wen is a medical student in the Class of 2019 at the University of Toronto

 

“Intersectionality” was always a term that I saw in academic discussions, but never something I consciously thought of as it pertains to my own identity as a person of colour — a Chinese-Canadian — and a woman. This changed in my third year of medical school, when I was no longer in the safe space of a classroom but in the real world as a clinical clerk, interacting with people from all walks of life.

In the hospital, I grew accustomed to patients, nurses, and sometimes even colleagues assuming I was a nurse based on my appearance: a small, young-appearing Asian woman. But it wasn’t until a 5-year-old patient took one look at me and said with conviction, “You’re not a doctor, you’re a nurse! Because you’re a girl and girls are nurses and boys are doctors!” that I was overwhelmed with the feeling that I did not “naturally” belong in the space of medicine. Of course, there is nothing wrong with being a nurse — they are amazing, competent individuals and I don't know how hospitals and clinics would run without them — but it's the automatic assumption that I am a nurse (which my male colleagues do not face) that is problematic. ...continue reading

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Yara Abou-Hamde is a medical student in the Class of 2019 at Western University

 

Dear Mom and Dad,

When you arrived in Canada eleven years ago with four young children, you knew you had given up everything familiar to give us a chance at a more secure life. What you did not know then was that your only daughter would go on to pursue a career in medicine, adding stretches of foreign terrain.

Now, I have made it to clinical clerkship. It has been a dream. You know how much joy I get from learning on the job and being able to provide care to patients. It has been both exciting and relieving to know for certain that I have chosen the right career path for myself. ...continue reading

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ben_headshotBenjamin Huang
University of British Columbia
Class of 2017

This piece was written as reflection on the author’s rural family medicine experience.

 

 

 

s is for sechelt.

s is for sunday arrivals and saturday departures. for seven thirty ferries, sun decks, and sightseeing at sea.

s is for surprises, for stairs to a fireplace and floors of dark mahogany wood. s is for setting tables and chairs and settling in. ...continue reading

professional headshot

Greg Costello
University of British Columbia
Class of 2016

“Let [the physician] reflect that he has undertaken the care of no mean creature…”
- Thomas Sydenham

“Did you hear that Mrs. Gavin died?”

The question wasn’t directed at me, but my stomach still dropped to my shoes.

“Oh no! I haven’t seen her around for a while... Was she sick?”
“Yes, she was in the hospital for about a month. Her funeral is later this week.

At that point I stopped listening to my colleagues as my mind went back to the emergency room a few days earlier. ...continue reading

IMG_0994Chandra Anokye
McMaster University
Class of 2016

It was an ordinary Wednesday in clerkship. Handover went smoothly, and postpartum rounds were going well. New moms on the ward were happy and healthy. Aside from the fact that CaRMS applications were opening at noon, it seemed like just another day in the life of a clinical clerk. If you squelched the nervous excitement induced by CaRMS opening (were we really going to be residents so soon?), everything was great. Blood pressures on the ward, other than ours, were pristine.

I started to experience a cramping flank pain by midmorning. Really, it had started the Monday before, but I’d chalked it up to exhaustion from a long night on call. Or maybe some weird peri-menstruation cramps, even though the timing was off.

I fidgeted in my chair as I scribbled away at SOAP notes. Just make it through the morning, I thought. Ibuprofen was waiting in my brilliant orange bag downstairs in the resident room.

The cramps persisted.

...continue reading

kevin dueckKevin Dueck
Western University
Class of 2016

This piece was originally created for and showcased at Creating Space V (a White Coat, Warm ART exhibit in Vancouver, BC from April 24 to 28, 2015). It collects words and phrases that have been lost during clinical training, some due to superstition, others due to social pressures or encounters with patients.

 

(It’s)
Slow
Quiet

(I)
Promise
Guarantee
Know

(They’re)
Irritable
Lethargic

(I’m)
Sure
Tired
Sick

(You’ll)
Be Fine
Get Back Home

(They’ll)
Take Good Care of You

 

Kevin has also published a piece titled "Learning From Experience" on our Blog. For more of his work, check out his Blog or follow him on Twitter @AbootMedicine.