Tag Archives: culture

Barbara Sibbald, News and Humanities editor for the Canadian Medical Association Journal, reads the CMAJ Humanities Encounters article "Lives uncovered: reflections on encounters with newly arrived Syrians" (subscription required). The article is written by Dr. Janet Warren, a family physician at Hamilton Urban Core Community Health Centre in Hamilton, Ontario.

In the article, Dr. Warren describes what it’s like to be a Canadian physician caring for newly arrived Syrian refugees. The encounters are true but patient details have been changed to protect confidentiality.

Listen to the article reading:

...continue reading

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Healey_imageGwen Healey is the Executive and Scientific Director of the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre in Iqaluit, Nunavut, and Assistant Professor at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. She was born and raised in Iqaluit, Nunavut, and continues to live and work in her beloved home of Iqaluit.

 

Truly understanding, and taking action on, health challenges experienced in our communities requires us to be critical of the models that are conventionally used, to challenge the dominant narratives on the origins of health inequities in our communities, and design systems that reflect the worldview of our communities. Addressing health problems in Nunavut should be no different. There are two main problems with the health care system in the territory: governance and the model on which health care is based ...continue reading

IMG_9498Shohinee Sarma
McMaster University
Class of 2016

One Kashmiri morning in the early spring of 1915, my grandfather Aadam Aziz hit his nose against a frost-hardened tussock of earth while attempting to pray. Three drops of blood plopped out of his left nostril, hardened instantly in the brittle air and lay before his eyes on the prayer-mat, transformed into rubies. Lurching back until he knelt with his head once more upright, he found that the tears which had sprung to his eyes had solidified, too; and at that moment, as he brushed diamonds contemptuously from his lashes, he resolved never again to kiss earth for any god or man. This decision, however, made a hole in him, a vacancy in a vital inner chamber, leaving him vulnerable to women and history. Unaware of this at first, despite his recently completed medical training, he stood up, rolled the prayer-mat into a thick cheroot, and holding it under his right arm surveyed the valley through clear, diamond-free eyes. (Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children)

I wish I could write like Salman Rushdie. ...continue reading