Tag Archives: discrimination

GroupPhotoMaxime Billick, Jeremy Cygler, Gabriel Devlin and Bellal Jubran are all third year medical students at McGill University

 

We are four fresh and eager medical students just beginning clerkship, but we can already attest to the importance of blood in medicine. We use blood to bring back patients from the brink of death in the operating room. We use it to treat patients with sickle cell disease on the medical wards. We use it to advance scientific knowledge in the research lab. Yet the policies that govern how we collect donated blood remain woefully antiquated. ...continue reading

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FullSizeRenderWill Caron
McMaster University
Class of 2016

Feeling like an outsider is never a pleasant experience. For some people and groups, exclusion is a part of everyday life. Being of a certain race, class, or gender (among others) gives us strength in identity, but also assigns us to a position in the social hierarchy. As a white man, I'm privileged to not belong to a "visible minority".

However, I am a member of a non-visible minority – I self-identify as a gay male. I am also a member of one of the most respected professions in the world.

This juxtaposition sometimes hits me when I think about the future. Will I be respected for my profession? Or will I be stigmatized and discriminated against by patients and colleagues alike for my minority status?  ...continue reading

photo_CSCarolyn Shimmin is a Knowledge Translation Coordinator with the George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation and EvidenceNetwork.ca

 

From Chaucer to Shakespeare, women’s consumption of alcohol and other drugs has been historically written about and portrayed as an absolute affront to the dictates of socially-constructed ideals around “respectable femininity.” Girls and women living with substance issues are often falsely perceived as hypersexual and sexually promiscuous (i.e. as “sluts” and “loose”). Beneath the rhetoric that “good girls don’t imbibe” lies a dangerously entrenched stigma within our society that ― combined with the fact that two out of three Canadians don’t understand sexual consent as well as the codification of certain rape myths in law ― means the bodies of certain girls and women living with substance use problems become spaces where sexual violence can occur with impunity. ...continue reading