Tag Archives: Domhnall MacAuley

Domhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK

 

The concept of the “Salon” is based on the tradition of European intellectual gatherings that led to the great literary, artistic and political movements of our time. At a recent meeting of primary care researchers in Colorado Springs, Frank deGruy gathered a group of colleagues in this way together to create discussion, debate and perhaps generate ideas. Such gatherings might take place with any group and in any context - in a department, region or nationally. On this occasion, Frank attracted a group of about twenty delegates of the NAPCRG meeting from various international and professional backgrounds and I was fortunate enough to be included. ...continue reading

1 Comment

Domhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK

 

How do you create a successful school of primary care research?  Measuring outputs through academic papers, presentations at international meetings, and the general impact of research, the UK primary care community has had remarkable success. The ten year celebration meeting of the School of Primary Care Research (SPCR) in England was an opportunity to reflect on their achievements and try to pick out the key factors in that success.

It wasn’t always this way. As an academic and an editor I know the struggle that researchers had in the early days. There were few grants, ...continue reading

1 Comment

Domhnall MacAuleyDomhnall_Mac is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK.

 

Dear Linda,

I have just read your book - or, should I say, it completely captivated me. I couldn’t put it down. What a compelling life story. When you lectured about depression at those Masterclass lectures I chaired years ago I was so impressed with your grasp of the topic, your understanding of the difficulties facing family doctors, and your overall approach to managing the condition. You had such a clear understanding and appreciation of depression and the difficulties of treating it in practice. And, you were so assured, confident, on top of your subject. I had chaired many similar sessions but yours were outstanding. There wasn’t even the slightest hint that your understanding extended so far into your personal experience. ...continue reading

1 Comment

Domhnall_MacDomhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK.

 

We publishing the wrong research and funding too many of the wrong studies. This was the general message from Adrian Bauman’s keynote address - "What gets published in physical activity research and why it seldom has an influence on policy" - at the Health Advancing Physical Activity (HEPA) conference.

The talk might have been about physical activity research but the message has resonance across medicine. If we really want to change medicine we really need to understand how researchers produce evidence and how policy makers interpret, or misinterpret, what is published. There is a significant mismatch between researchers’ objectives and policy makers’ needs. And, rarely heard in a medical context, Adrian was quite sympathetic to the needs of policymakers. ...continue reading

Domhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK.

 

As the world focuses on the Olympics in Rio, I visited the Allan McGavin Sports Centre at UBC to hear the views of some current and future opinion leaders in Canadian Sports Medicine. Dr Jack Taunton is a legend in Canadian Sports Medicine. An athlete who competed at the highest level, he was a leader in the development of clinical sports medicine in Canada and a pioneer in teaching and research. He co-founded the Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Centre in 1979 and is a Professor in Sports Medicine at UBC, where I visited him recently to talk to him about what it takes to provide medical care for the Olympics.  Jack was Chief Medical Officer for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, Chief Medical Officer for Canada at the Sydney Olympics, two Pan American and two World Student Games.  He was also Women's Team Physician and Association Coordinating Physician for Field Hockey Canada for over 25 years. Jack was a co-founder of the Vancouver Marathon, the Vancouver Sun Run and, most recently, the UBC Grand Prix of Cycling.

Here's my video interview with Dr Taunton. ...continue reading

Domhnall_MacDomhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK.

 

The following brief video summary of the recent International Colloquium on Clinical Academic Careers in Primary Care highlights enthusiasm, strong collaboration and funding as key facilitators for robust primary care research. ...continue reading

DMacA_3Domhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK.

 

I'm heading to Oxford, England, this week, to teach a session at the EQUATOR [Network's] Publication School. I'll be talking about what scientific editors do - and particularly about what they want - as well as what to do to ensure that you get your paper published. From writing a good submission letter, to responding well to peer reviewers' comments in a revision, it's important to pay attention to detail. Here's a brief video summary ...continue reading

Domhnall_MacDomhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK. He recently attended the 2016 Primary Health Care Research Conference (PHCRIS) in Canberra, Australia
 

Grant Russell, newly elected for a second term as President of the Australasia Association of Academic Primary Care (AAAPC) was upbeat in his introduction to the second day of the meeting. He reminded us how the Canadian academic, Martin Bass, had warned against learned helplessness and he pointed out that primary care has much more influence than we give ourselves credit for.

Claire Jackson, one of Australia’s leading primary care researchers was introduced at her plenary lecture as “an eternal optimist”. True to form, she told us that there has never been a more exciting time to be in primary care research. She listed the national primary health care strategy, the primary care framework, and the 31 primary health networks. While there have been numerous health care reforms, each one has primary care at its centre and there is growing government awareness of the need to address complex chronic illness in community. ...continue reading

1 Comment

Domhnall_MacDomhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK. He is currently attending the 2016 Primary Health Care Research Conference in Canberra, Australia

 

“This is the time to be in general practice...This is the time to be in general practice research,”
said Steve Hambleton,  former chair of the Primary Health Care Advisory Group, a body created to look at options to reform care for people with complex and chronic illness. Steve gave the opening conference address. He spoke about the advisory group's work, their wide ranging membership including family doctors, other providers and consumers, and he outlined three areas that would be major challenges in the future: chronic care, obesity, and preventable disease. Steve also reminded us that those patients with the greatest number of diseases see the greatest number of doctors. The final report, delivered on ...continue reading

DMacA_3Domhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK

 

Couch potatoes say that you never see a happy jogger, and they might be right. Too many runners train too hard, think “no-pain-no-gain” and don’t take time to step back.  Intelligent middle aged high achievers (like us doctors) often make the same mistakes.  Forget the Sports Guru nonsense. Your body is not a highly tuned Grand Prix racing machine.  Most of us just chug along like a four-door family saloon. So, here are a few suggestions to help you avoid injury, burn out, and boredom. Basic, simple and obvious, they won’t sell many running magazines but they might be of some use to middle of the road athletes expecting miracles, underachievers who mismatch training loads and life circumstance, and obsessives who feel rest and relaxation should be avoided at all costs. ...continue reading