Tag Archives: genomics

nichollsStuart Nicholls is a Clinical Investigator and Methodologist at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute and Methodologist at the Ontario Child Health Support Unit (OCHSU). He recently attended the 66th Annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) in Vancouver

 

The ASHG annual meeting takes place every fall towards the end of October or in early November, as the leaves are changing from green to reds and golds. Every four years the meeting also takes place against the backdrop of the US presidential elections. In 2012, in San Francisco, when the meeting ran from the 6th to the 10th of November, I recall standing in the main hall as part of the opening ‘mixer’ event, where several thousand scientists watched a big screen projection as President Obama was re-elected to office.

This year's meeting, which ran from the 18th to the 22nd of October, took place against the backdrop of a very different election ...continue reading

AHoweAmanda Howe is Professor of Primary Care at the University of East Anglia in Norwich - one of the newer medical schools in the U.K. She is also a GP, Vice Chair of Council at the RCGP, and President-Elect of the World Organization of Family Doctors. She writes here in a personal capacity.

 

When I starting out as a junior researcher, the big fight was to get primary care research into the universities and the big national and charitable funding streams. The first professor of general practice took up post in 1962, and by 1992 when I became a lecturer, most medical schools had a department of general practice (‘family medicine’ in other countries). But all my seniors still talked as if they were fighting an uphill battle – treated as a minority group, outsiders, less powerful, less well funded, and with a tide to turn against the biomedical ‘lab to bedside’ paradigm.

20+ years on, I am not sure whether that victim voice still needs to be heard. There are some amazing big research units now in U.K. – the School of Primary Care’s member departments all punching above their weight, far more applied funding going into primary care and epidemiological work via the National Institute for Health Research, and medical schools being complemented by nursing and allied health units with excellent track records of their own research.

But some medical schools have put their GP teachers into medical education departments, and made their GP researchers a small part of a ‘big’ health services research unit. And others try to establish a research profile and national/international impact with fewer than 2 full-time academic GPs (my own unit). My ‘Primary Care Group’ also contains brilliant bright colleagues from public health, health economics, sociology and ethics – and the university sees this as a good mixture for applied methods research - but it is not much capacity for clinical work, research, teaching, and academic leadership.

I see tensions from the clinical side ...continue reading

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glamour1Lauren Vogel is a news editor at CMAJ

“We just don't know.” It's not exactly what most people want to hear from medicine's top minds. We want our healers to be certain. And with rapid improvements in genetic research, Big Data, diagnostic imaging, and personalized, predictive medicine, there's more information than ever about what makes us tick.

“We've made stunning progress,” Dr. Elizabeth Nabel, former director of the US National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, told participants at #TEDMED2014 yesterday. “But the simple truth is what we have is not knowledge; it's information that is going to morph and shift into something else next week, next year or in 50 years.”

The more we know, the more we should realize the limits of what we know, she said. “We are desperately in the dark about how most things work. Humility is the secret ingredient that unveils truth and brings about change.”

It will also help us roll with the punches as rapid change becomes the norm, said ...continue reading