Tag Archives: Matt Eagles

Matt Eagles is soon to graduate from Memorial University's medical school, and is headed to a Neurosurgery Residency program at the University of Calgary; he is a former Major Junior and University hockey player and a founding member of Concussion-U

 

On Monday May 1, 2017, the Pittsburgh Penguins entered their second-round playoff game against the Washington Capitals with a tight 2-0 grip on their best-of-7 playoff series. An important reason for this was the play of their star captain: Sidney Crosby.

Through 2 games in the series, Crosby had scored 2 goals and added 2 assists. He was, as he had been for much of the preceding year, playing at a level higher than anyone else in the sport of hockey. However, in the first period of game three, the fortunes of the Pengiuns and their superstar appeared to change when he was cross-checked in the face by the Washington Capitals’ Matt Niskanen.

Crosby lay on the ice for several minutes, and was eventually helped up by his teammates before skating off the ice under his own power. ...continue reading

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Matt_HockeyMatt Eagles is a medical student at Memorial University, Newfoundland and Labrador (Class of 2017) and a former Major Junior and University hockey player. He is a founding member of Concussion-U

 

On Saturday November 19, 2011 I took the ice for warm-up against the UPEI Panthers. It was just another night at the rink. My routine felt no different than it had for any of the other 300 or so games I played in my Major Junior and University Careers. What I did not know at the time was that this would be the last game of competitive hockey I would ever play.

In the second period, I suffered my third concussion in a ten-month span. I had gone through the recovery process in the past, and I figured that I would be fine in no time. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case. When I tried to return to the classroom about a week later, I could not focus. If I tried to sit down and read, I would get headaches. By this point in my life I had shifted my dream from playing in the NHL to attending medical school. I quickly realized that my playing days might be numbered, and I sought expert advice. Both physicians and psychologists advised that I should walk away from the game. They said that continuing to play hockey would be putting my brain at risk for long-term impairment. Reluctantly, I heeded their counsel. My hockey career was over. ...continue reading