Tag Archives: Moneeza Walji

Walji_Moneeza_01Moneeza Walji is the CMAJ Editorial Fellow 2014–2015

In 2012, there were 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million cancer deaths. Of those, 65% were in the developing world. Yet despite this large toll, the world still does not have a global body to coordinate cancer prevention and management efforts.

On Wednesday, March 25, the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Global Health hosted the Symposium on Global Cancer Research, bringing together leaders to speak about issues at the intersection of global health and cancer. ...continue reading

Moneeza cropMoneeza Walji is CMAJ's editorial fellow 2014-15

Some would say it is strange to remind physicians or health care workers of the humanity of medicine, I would argue with the onslaught of new drugs, new research, and new technology to make medicine a faster evolving machine… we have sometimes forgotten the art of interacting as humans. So when Dr. Abraham Verghese gave a talk at TEDMED 2014 on metaphor and medicine (and language and medicine more broadly) it struck a chord.

During my medical school training I had often heard (sometimes from older and wiser physicians) that the art of the physical exam was dying with the increase in tests that allowed us, at times, to not touch or even see patients before making a diagnosis, let alone speak with them. One physician said we were losing the intimacy in medicine that allowed us to really listen to what was needed from those in our care. Much of what I gleaned from Dr. Verghese’s TEDMED speech was similar, we needed those moments of communication.

Dr. Verghese is Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine and Senior Associate Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine, at Stanford University Medical School. He is also a best-selling author, having written fiction and non-fiction throughout his career. So when he asked “What is a metaphor?” I found I really wanted to hear his answer. ...continue reading

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Moneeza cropMoneeza Walji is the CMAJ Editorial Fellow 2014-15

You’ve likely been nominated by someone in your family, your group of friends or in your organization to do the ALS Ice Bucket challenge. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), often called Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a disease characterized by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons. The cause of the disease is unclear and it has no known cure. Approximately 2,500 to 3,000 people in Canada are affected by ALS according to the ALS Society of Canada. As the ALS Ice Bucket challenge has taken Facebook - and the world - by storm, social media is abuzz with a new term: "Slacktivism". ...continue reading