Tag Archives: OMA

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N_JoshiNikhil Joshi is a Fellow in Clinical Immunology at the University of Manitoba. He wrote a blog for CBC about his experience with cancer

I was reading about Allergic Bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) when it hit me.

Modern Medicine is taking a beating.

A day goes by in clinic. I’ve told three people today that the medications they are taking are keeping them from having uncontrolled asthma or an attack of angioedema and please not to stop them. I’m explaining that the disease is worse than the medications, which we give to children as young as 2. I sigh. I hate this. I scan the news headlines after my dictations are finished. I read about the NDP and Liberal party stances on physician corporations, which will probably lead to financial hardship on new physicians starting practice with entirely crippling levels of debt amid a background of rising overhead and reduced fee schedules. I’m further disheartened.

When did the world care so little about medicine? When did being a physician become so difficult and unrewarding? ...continue reading

DMacA_ski_resizeDomhnall MacAuley is a CMAJ Associate Editor and a professor of primary care in Northern Ireland, UK. This week he is attending the CASEM-OMA Sports Medicine symposium in Ottawa.

 

Edu-tainment is how we need engage audiences, according to Andrew Pipe, chair of the opening session of the CASEM-OMA 2015 meeting in Ottawa. And what a superb opening session. Ian Shrier and Pierre Frémont introduced their five key sports medicine papers and debates of the last year. From a CMAJ perspective, it was great to hear Ian cite our systematic review on arthroscopic surgery for degenerative tears of the meniscus as a key paper. He made a very important point that the outcome was the minimally important difference to patients. The authors had used the average but, looking at the minimally important difference distribution, this may not be entirely reflective, and some people may have had a benefit in the short term although, in the long term, there was no effect.

Concussion is a major issue and Pierre reminded us of a paper emphasising that concussion management protocols should include cervicovestibular evaluation ...continue reading