Tag Archives: patient experience

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Ray Schachter is a lawyer in Vancouver. He is on the Executive Committee of the Global Sepsis Alliance and Canadian Sepsis Foundation

 

In March 1996, I was a healthy, fit 50-year-old man enjoying life with a young family.  A month later, I was in an induced coma fighting for my life against acute septic shock accompanied by severe adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multi-joint and -organ dysfunction which frequently accompanies sepsis.  My sepsis was brought on by Group A Streptococcus (Strep A) in my bloodstream which compromised almost all my joints.

My trajectory which led to acute sepsis is not unusual.  On Day 1, I had a very severe, but short-lived, bout of extremely high fever (40.5 degrees Celsius), followed by excruciating hip pain the following day.

By Day 3, the hip pain had become unbearable.  That evening, we called my family doctor’s on-call service and a doctor came to the house at midnight.  The physician felt my condition was osteoarthritis and prescribed anti-inflammatories.

On Day 4, my wife became so concerned that she called a doctor who was a family friend.  ...continue reading

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Doctor Mom is a physician who lives in Ontario*

 

It’s March Break, which means last chance to do winter activities for some families in Canada. Unfortunately, I’m not Winter Fun Mom so I booked Son #2 - the only person in our family who is interested in winter sports - on a bus-in snowboarding camp. On day 1 I warned him to be careful and to try not to injure himself. On day 2 I forgot to warn him. So at 2pm on day 2 I got a call from the snowboard instructor to tell me that my son had fallen and would soon be on his way to hospital in an ambulance.

I know I should be more encouraging of adventure and more accepting of risk-taking in my boys. ...continue reading

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N_JoshiNikhil Joshi is a Fellow in Clinical Immunology at the University of Manitoba. He wrote a blog for CBC about his experience with cancer

I was reading about Allergic Bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) when it hit me.

Modern Medicine is taking a beating.

A day goes by in clinic. I’ve told three people today that the medications they are taking are keeping them from having uncontrolled asthma or an attack of angioedema and please not to stop them. I’m explaining that the disease is worse than the medications, which we give to children as young as 2. I sigh. I hate this. I scan the news headlines after my dictations are finished. I read about the NDP and Liberal party stances on physician corporations, which will probably lead to financial hardship on new physicians starting practice with entirely crippling levels of debt amid a background of rising overhead and reduced fee schedules. I’m further disheartened.

When did the world care so little about medicine? When did being a physician become so difficult and unrewarding? ...continue reading

KaylynnKaylynn Purdy
Northern Ontario School of Medicine
Class of 2018

My own experiences as a patient when I was a teenager are what pushed me towards medicine. I want to remember what the “patient experience” is like throughout my training and eventually into practice because it helps keep me grounded in empathy. As I train to become a doctor I can feel those memories and feelings slowly slipping away and being replaced by the “doctor experience.” This poem was written to reflect on what it feels like to be on the other side of the hospital bed, the importance of remembering where you came from, and the juxtapositions and parallels of my patient and medical trainee experience. ...continue reading