Tag Archives: podcast

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Diagnostic delay of central nervous system tumours in children has serious implications for the children and their families. Dr. Ran Goldman, Pediatrician at BC Children's Hospital, Professor of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia and Chief Medical Officer for the website medschoolforparents.com, discusses how practitioners can maintain a high index of suspicion for these rare tumours, yet not overinvestigate benign conditions.

Dr. Goldman co-authored a review article (subscription required) on pediatric central nervous system tumours published in CMAJ.

Listen to the podcast:

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Barbara Sibbald, News and Humanities editor for the Canadian Medical Association Journal, reads the CMAJ Humanities Encounters article "First, do no harm" (subscription required). The article is written by Dr. Sarah Tulk, a family medicine resident at McMaster University.

In the article, Dr. Tulk reflects on the time she treated a terminally ill patient in the emergency department.

Listen to the article reading:

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Barbara Sibbald, News and Humanities editor for the Canadian Medical Association Journal, reads the CMAJ Humanities Encounters article "Words, deeds and interpretations". The article is written by Dr. Mary Seeman, professor emerita, in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto.

In the article, Dr. Seeman, an older psychiatrist, recounts how acting instead of talking can net rather dire results. The events are true but happened decades ago.

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Supraventricular tachycardias represent a range of tachyarrhythmias originating from a circuit or focus involving the atria or the atrioventricular node. Prompt recognition of the specific type of arrhythmia is essential to determine therapeutic management. Dr. Lior Bibas, cardiology fellow at McGill University in Montréal, Québec, discusses various approaches to treatment. He co-authored a review article (subscription required) published in the CMAJ.

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People who smoke tobacco may be interested in quitting, reducing their smoking or neither. Physicians can offer interventions for all of these groups. In this podcast interview, Dr. Robert Reid and Dr. Andrew Pipe – experts on smoking cessation from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute’s Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation – offer practical advice to guide physicians in helping their patients. They, and co-authors, have reviewed evidence on smoking cessation initiatives in an article published in CMAJ.

Full review article (subscription required): www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.151510

 

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Physicians from many specialties may care for inpatients with opioid use disorder. An acute hospital admission is an opportunity to engage with patients who have this common, chronic disorder, discuss addiction treatment and possibly affect the course of their illness. In this podcast, Dr. Joseph Donroe, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, discusses the best approach to specific problems that may arise when a patient with chronic opioid use disorder is hospitalized for another reason. Potential problems include withdrawal symptoms and managing acute pain.

Dr. Donroe co-authored a review article published in the CMAJ (subscription required).

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Interview with Dr. Camilla Zimmermann, head of the palliative care program at UHN in Toronto, associate professor and Rose family Chair in the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto, as well as senior scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre.

In a research article (open access) she co-authored, Dr. Zimmermann conducted interviews with patients and their caregivers in an effort to understand attitude and perceptions about palliative care. Early palliative care improves quality of life, symptom management and satisfaction with care in patients with advanced cancer. However, stigma associated with the term palliative care may be a barrier to timely referral.

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RCTs of treatment as prevention have shown significant prevention of onward HIV transmission among serodiscordant couples, but observational studies of clinical practice have not consistently replicated these findings. There are particular concerns among men who have sex with men (MSM).

In this podcast, Dr. Paul MacPherson explores some of the issues. Dr. MacPherson is a specialist in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Ottawa Hospital, an associate professor in the Department of Medicine, and the Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Ottawa, and a clinician scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute.

In their analysis article (subscription required), Dr. MacPherson and his co-author Patrick O’Byrne examine HIV treatment as prevention in MSM.

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Interview with Dr. Shannon Humphrey, medical and cosmetic dermatologist in Vancouver, and assistant professor and director of CME in the Department of Dermatology and Skin Science at the University of British Columbia.

Acne can adversely affect quality of life and may lead to emotional distress and permanent scarring. This evidence-based guideline (open access) was developed to facilitate efficient diagnosis and effective treatment of acne vulgaris in the Canadian population. With early diagnosis, treatment of active lesions and prevention of adverse sequelae, the health of many Canadians with acne may be improved.

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Interview with Dr. David Liu, Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. In their clinical practice guideline (open access), Dr. Liu and colleagues provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), including anticoagulation, thrombus removal strategies and inferior vena cava filters. The poor outcomes seen in patients with iliofemoral DVT treated with standard anticoagulant therapy have led to exploration of other treatment options. The prevention and treatment of post-thrombotic syndrome are also addressed.

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