Tag Archives: pregnancy loss

Philippe Barrette is a psychotherapist, workplace facilitator and former Assistant Clinical Professor at McMaster University, Department of Psychiatry.

David Streiner is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, and the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster University; and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto.

 

 

Halfway through, Roma, the 2018 award-winning film set in the early 1970’s, the audience is suddenly confronted with witnessing a stillbirth. The scene elicited audible gasps from some viewers in a screening we attended, when the perfectly formed, dead baby was removed from its mother’s womb.

In the film, Cleo, the nanny and domestic worker for a middle-class family living in Mexico is rushed to hospital following an emotionally draining 9 months. Cleo’s boyfriend abandoned her shortly after learning of her pregnancy, and the family have endured marital tensions and a separation.

After an initial examination the assisting physician at the birth says, “I can’t hear a heartbeat," ...continue reading

irisIris Gorfinkel is a General Practitioner and Principal Investigator / Founder of PrimeHealth Clinical Research in Toronto, Ontario.

 

After 25 years of practising women’s health, I am continually taken aback by ongoing erroneous beliefs surrounding miscarriage. Despite improved access to information via the internet, many women continue to be under the false impression that the loss is self-generated.

In a survey of more than 1 000 men and women, respondents most commonly cited a stressful event (76%), longstanding stress (74%) and lifting a heavy object (64%) as causes of pregnancy loss. In addition, respondents inaccurately thought that miscarriage could be caused by sexually transmitted disease (41%), a previous abortion (31%) or use of implanted long-term birth control (28%). Nearly 23% of respondents erroneously believed a miscarriage could be caused solely by the woman not wanting the pregnancy.

Could the very word we choose to use — miscarriage — be partly to blame for these false impressions? ...continue reading