Tag Archives: sexual orientation

June Duong is a medical student in the Class of 2019 at Queen's University

 

Author’s note: This is a satire inspired by #tampongate on Twitter, which occurred on October 27, 2018 in response to policies regarding the use of menstrual hygiene products during the MCCQEII. All characters in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Dr. John Doe woke up on Saturday morning and cooked himself a large breakfast. It was doomsday, for he would be doing his exam this weekend. He was going to be out all day. He did not know whether he would be doing the exam in the morning or in the afternoon — not that it mattered in the end, since he would be sequestered for the rest of the time anyway. As far as the instructions he’s been provided with, all they said was, “Do not bring food. A light snack will be provided depending on your examination schedule.” Dr. Doe, with his three degrees, translated this statement into a big, fat maybe. You may get food so that you can focus on your exam, or you may have an empty stomach gnawing away at itself. ...continue reading

Maggie Hulbert is a medical student in the Class of 2020 at Queen's University

 

The Remedy: Queer and Trans Voices on Health and Healthcare
(Arsenal Pulp Press, 2016)

In the introduction to The Remedy, British Columbia-based editor Zena Sharman states her intention plainly: to make people’s stories the centre of conversations on queer and transgender health. The resulting anthology is a stunning and captivating look at the past, present, and future of health and healthcare as it relates to LGBTQ+ people in Canada that more than accomplishes Sharman’s goal. A long-standing frustration with healthcare providers is a common theme among the stories contained in The Remedy. ...continue reading

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FullSizeRenderWill Caron
McMaster University
Class of 2016

Feeling like an outsider is never a pleasant experience. For some people and groups, exclusion is a part of everyday life. Being of a certain race, class, or gender (among others) gives us strength in identity, but also assigns us to a position in the social hierarchy. As a white man, I'm privileged to not belong to a "visible minority".

However, I am a member of a non-visible minority – I self-identify as a gay male. I am also a member of one of the most respected professions in the world.

This juxtaposition sometimes hits me when I think about the future. Will I be respected for my profession? Or will I be stigmatized and discriminated against by patients and colleagues alike for my minority status?  ...continue reading