Tag Archives: social justice

griswoldKim Griswold is Associate Professor of Family Medicine, Psychiatry, and Public Health and Health Professions at Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in Buffalo, New York. Dr Griswold will be speaking at the forthcoming North American Primary Care Research Group (NAPCRG) annual meeting.

 

Communities in every nation are faced with providing competent, equitable and culturally appropriate services for resettling refugees. Health centric disciplines are not enough to meet the challenges presented by these newly arriving populations, nor to alleviate the disparities they face – such as isolation, limited English proficiency, differences in patients’ attitudes and health literacy levels, and a lack of cultural awareness on the part of providers.

Health inequity can be defined as: “unjust differences in health between persons of different social groups.” ...continue reading

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sarahCSarah Currie is a medical copy editor at CMAJ

 

More than 800 000 Canadians access food banks each month, and no province or territory is unaffected by food insecurity. As citizens of one of the wealthiest countries in the world, Canadians should not have to struggle to put healthy meals on their families’ tables — families living on minimum wage should not have to go into debt to benefit from a nutritious diet. We tend to concern ourselves with these issues during traditional “giving” holidays, particularly Thanksgiving and Christmas. As a result, donations to food banks hit a lull during the summer, which unfortunately coincides with increased demand due to children no longer being enrolled in school-based meal programs. We need to be concerned year-round.  ...continue reading

CMAJ Photograph OgunyemiBoluwaji Ogunyemi is a Dermatology Resident Physician in Vancouver, BC, and a freelance writer for the Huffington Post, Ubyssey Newspaper, and the Online Journal for Community and Person-centered Dermatology

As one of my last off-service rotations in residency, I completed an elective rotation in refugee primary care. I was attracted to the idea of a global population placed locally, because I plan to work internationally as part of my future practice, and I enjoy cross-cultural aspects of medicine.

It would turn out that I received a lot more than I had bargained for! ...continue reading

doanRichard Doan is a Psychiatrist with Inner City Health Associates and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto in Toronto, Ontario

 

In Toronto’s first week of true winter weather, two homeless men died on the street, one in a bus shelter in the city’s most public square. He was wearing only jeans, a t-shirt and a hospital identification bracelet.

My street outreach teammates and I saw a slight, older woman who had literally been living in a box for months.* The box was about 6 feet long, 4 feet wide and 3 feet high and was covered by a blue plastic tarp. Her furnishings consisted of a few blankets. The “dwelling” was in an alleyway just behind some shops. The lady was disinterested in any form of housing or treatment and never accessed shelters: she always slept in her box. She repeatedly said that she would soon be moving to a Caribbean island. During a particularly bitter cold spell, we became concerned with her safety, and I completed a form for involuntary psychiatric assessment. The emergency department psychiatrist agreed with me that she likely had chronic schizophrenia, but the client was calm and would not take any medication. She promised the emergency department staff that she would go to a shelter if she was discharged. We made it clear that she was unlikely to do so, but after one night in emergency she was given a subway token to go to a shelter. She disappeared and was lost to follow-up. ...continue reading

O WilliamsOgochukwu Crystal Williams is a Child Protection Specialist and Director/Founder of Uniquely Destined Ltd. in Blackfalds, Alberta

 

I feel a need to highlight the deficit and treatment of mental illness still taking place in this day and age. I am a British citizen who currently resides and works in Canada. I have more than 7 years’ experience in the field of child protection and mental health, working with both children and adults in the United Kingdom and North America. In the UK, I helped develop and establish policies for organizations and charities that are used internationally. From direct experience, I realize that mental health is a global issue. ...continue reading

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abdullahnasserAbdullah Nasser is a medical student at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, in London, Ontario

 

The lecture hall slowly came to life. Notebooks in hand, the students filed in to take the front rows. They spoke in hushed tones, ready to put those notebooks to use at any minute. I have not seen a crowd of students so eager to start. But this was not your average university lecture. In fact, it was not a lecture at all. It was a premedical symposium intended to introduce them to medical schools and the application process.

 As the symposium got underway, the various steps of the application process were explained in true medical fashion — with an alphabet soup. You write your MCAT, and then start your OMSAS. If you don’t mind being an IMG, you might also consider filling out your AMCAS or UCAS, just in case. Be prepared to do your MMIs if you they call you in for an interview.

The students seemed unfazed. They know medicine is their true calling. “I’ve wanted to be a doctor ever since I was five,” one of them told me with a mixture of pride and determination.

That was until we got to the financial section. ...continue reading