Tag Archives: transgender health

June Duong is a medical student in the Class of 2019 at Queen's University

 

Author’s note: This is a satire inspired by #tampongate on Twitter, which occurred on October 27, 2018 in response to policies regarding the use of menstrual hygiene products during the MCCQEII. All characters in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Dr. John Doe woke up on Saturday morning and cooked himself a large breakfast. It was doomsday, for he would be doing his exam this weekend. He was going to be out all day. He did not know whether he would be doing the exam in the morning or in the afternoon — not that it mattered in the end, since he would be sequestered for the rest of the time anyway. As far as the instructions he’s been provided with, all they said was, “Do not bring food. A light snack will be provided depending on your examination schedule.” Dr. Doe, with his three degrees, translated this statement into a big, fat maybe. You may get food so that you can focus on your exam, or you may have an empty stomach gnawing away at itself. ...continue reading

Maggie Hulbert is a medical student in the Class of 2020 at Queen's University

 

The Remedy: Queer and Trans Voices on Health and Healthcare
(Arsenal Pulp Press, 2016)

In the introduction to The Remedy, British Columbia-based editor Zena Sharman states her intention plainly: to make people’s stories the centre of conversations on queer and transgender health. The resulting anthology is a stunning and captivating look at the past, present, and future of health and healthcare as it relates to LGBTQ+ people in Canada that more than accomplishes Sharman’s goal. A long-standing frustration with healthcare providers is a common theme among the stories contained in The Remedy. ...continue reading

RThom photoRobyn Thom is a PGY 1 psychiatry resident at Harvard Longwood

 

It was a winter afternoon when I came to the shocking realization that although I was only months away from becoming a doctor, there was a significant subset of the Canadian population that I lacked the medical knowledge to care for. I was working at the Gender Identity Clinic at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), where patients undergo psychiatric assessment to qualify for provincially-funded gender reassignment surgery. There, not only did I find myself listening to my patients rattle off multiple behavioural, hormonal, and surgical options for gender transition that I had never heard of before, but I also gained an appreciation for the degree to which skilled healthcare for transpeople in Ontario is lacking. ...continue reading