Tag Archives: prescriptions

Hillel M. Finestone is a Physiatrist at the Elisabeth Bruyere Hospital and Professor, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Ottawa.

 

My 52-year-old patient took his BP at a pharmacy on 6 separate occasions.  Systolic BP values were high, ranging from 150-177. When I take his BP in the office it’s 168/98.  Yup, he has high BP.  He’s 10 pounds overweight, doesn’t have diabetes, doesn’t smoke and thinks that he was told that his BP was “probably high” 5 years ago, but he didn’t feel that medications would make a difference.

We talk about weight loss, healthy eating and reducing high sodium foods, that we don’t know why BP elevates but that medications really work and help stop strokes and heart attacks from occurring.  He agrees to my prescription of one medication and we discuss its side effects.  A drug information sheet is provided. ...continue reading

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The new Canadian guideline presents evidence-based recommendations for prescribing of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain, including maximum dose recommendations, avoiding opioids in high-risk populations, and guidance for tapering.

Jason Busse, Associate Professor in the Department of Anesthesia at McMaster University and researcher with the Michael G. DeGroote National Pain Centre in Hamilton, Ontario, co-authored the guideline (open access). In this podcast, he speaks with Dr. Diane Kelsall, interim editor-in-chief, CMAJ, and explains the recommendations.

Listen to the author interview:

...continue reading

Dr. Matthew Stanbrook, deputy editor of CMAJ, interviews Dr. Danielle Martin, family physician and VP of Medical Affairs and Health System Solutions at Women's College Hospital in Toronto (and she made headlines last year when she eloquently defended our healthcare system in front of the US Senate during the Obamacare debate).

Dr. Martin and co-authors (Steven Morgan, Michael Law, Jamie R. Daw, Liza Abraham) say that implementing universal public coverage of prescription drugs in Canada would be estimated to reduce total spending by $7.2 billion while increasing government costs by only $1.0 billion. This economic modeling study shows that universal public drug coverage could be implemented without substantially increasing government spending.

Read full article.

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